Michigan Achieves! Progress Indicators

To know whether we’re on track with our goals of becoming a top ten state, The Education Trust-Midwest began tracking Michigan’s performance and progress of our P-16 system in 2016, in both academic measures and measures of learning conditions that research shows are essential for equitable access to opportunities to learn. Below, we share our progress toward becoming a top ten education state by 2030, as part of our Michigan Achieves initiative.

We use the best available state and national data to show where we are and where we’re headed by 2030 if we continue down our current path.

Hover over or click on a chart for more information.

4th GRADE READING

WHAT IT IS:

A telling indicator of whether Michigan’s students are being prepared for success is how well our young students read. The National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) is the largest nationally representative and continuing assessment of what America’s students know and can do in various subject areas. The assessment is given every two years and provides necessary information on student performance and growth for several indictors, including fourth-grade reading.

 

WHY IT MATTERS:

Reading proficiency is tied to all kinds of academic and life outcomes, and improving early reading is much more cost-effective than intervening with older students, when they are many years behind in school, or dropping out. Michigan must drastically improve our early literacy achievement for all students and close the achievement gaps that keep far too many of our low-income children and students of color from fulfilling their significant potential.

CURRENT RANK:

41ST

2030 PROJECTED RANK:

48TH

CURRENT RANK:

38TH

2030 PROJECTED RANK:

43RD

8th GRADE MATH

WHAT IT IS:

The national Assessment of Educational Progress (nAEP) is the largest nationally representative and continuing assessment of what America’s students know and can do in various subject areas. The assessment is given every two years and provides necessary information on student performance and growth for several indictors, including eighth-grade math.

WHY IT MATTERS:

In addition to basic reading skills, math skills are essential for all students. basic algebra is the foundation for high-level math courses. when students have not mastered this foundation, they are forced to enroll in remedial courses when they begin college. but eighth-grade math skills are not just for those students who are college-bound. A study conducted by ACT found that along with reading skills, math skills are essential for vocational jobs including those as a plumber, electrician or an upholsterer.

College Readiness

WHAT IT IS:

Remedial coursework is necessary for students who lack fundamental skills in a subject area – skills that should have been developed in k-12. These courses also are not credit bearing, meaning they don’t count toward a degree.

 

WHY IT MATTERS:

About 28.6 percent of all Michigan students were required to take at least one remedial course in college. That’s more than a quarter of our students who are forced to pay for additional instruction in college before moving on to credit-bearing courses. The percentage is even more startling for African American students, where more than half are required to enroll in college remedial courses. having to enroll in remedial courses can mean additional costs for students and more time to complete their degrees.

CURRENT RANK:

29%

ENROLLED IN 

REMEDIAL COURSES

2030 PROJECTED RANK:

53%

ENROLLED IN

REMEDIAL COURSES

CURRENT RANK:

14TH

2030 PROJECTED RANK:

18TH

COLLEGE AND POST-SECONDARY ENROLLMENT

WHAT IT IS:

This measure represents the percentage of high school graduates in each state who attend college anywhere in the U.S. directly from high school.

WHY IT MATTERS:

In order for Michigan’s students to fulfill their true potential and be the leaders of tomorrow, more of them must enroll in post-secondary training, whether that be at a trade school, community college, or a four-year university. On this measure, Michigan is near the national average, ranking 14th of 45, with about 64 percent of high school graduates attending some form of postsecondary training in 2014.

COLLEGE ATTAINMENT

WHAT IT IS:

This indicator represents the percent of people 25 years or older in each state and nationally who have completed a bachelor’s degree.

WHY IT MATTERS:

In 2015, Michigan ranked 27th of 43 in the percentage of adults 25 or older who have completed a bachelor’s degree, at 28 percent. yet, roughly 17 percent of African American or hispanic Michiganders have completed a bachelor’s degree.

CURRENT RANK:

27TH

2030 PROJECTED RANK:

31ST

TEACHER EFFECTIVENESS

Without a doubt, a child’s academic learning is dependent on many factors. but what research is clear on is that the number one in-school predictor of student success is the teaching quality in a child’s classroom. In leading states, sophisticated data systems provide teaching effectiveness data that are used for many purposes, such as professional development and early student interventions. In Michigan, those data are unavailable at this time.

ACCESS TO RIGOROUS COURSEWORK

WHAT IT IS:

Access to rigorous coursework is measured by the College board AP Program Participation and Performance data. The data represent the total number of AP exams administered per 1000 11th and 12th grade students.

 

WHY IT MATTERS:

One of the best ways to ensure more students are college- and career-ready is to increase access to rigorous coursework in high school, such as Advanced Placement courses. Research shows that just taking these classes – even if a student does not earn credit in a college-level course – increases the likelihood that the students will go to college.i Michigan is currently ranked 30th of 47.

CURRENT RANK:

30TH

2030 PROJECTED RANK:

30TH

CURRENT RANK:

43RD

2030 PROJECTED RANK:

NOT YET AVAILABLE

SCHOOL FUNDING EQUITY

WHAT IT IS:

This measure represents how highest and lowest poverty districts are funded based on state and local revenues and whether or not it is equitably distributed.

WHY IT MATTERS:

Michigan ranks an abysmal 43nd of 47 states in the nation for funding gaps that negatively impact low-income students. On average, Michigan schools serving the highest rates of students from low-income families receive about 5 percent less in state and local funding than more affluent schools. This lack of equity can lead to further imbalances in our educational system as a whole.

TEACHER SALARY EQUITY

WHAT IT IS:

This measure represents the gap in average teacher salaries between Michigan high-income and low-income districts.

 

WHY IT MATTERS:

Teachers in Michigan’s wealthiest districts are paid about $15,100 more, on average, than teachers in Michigan’s poorest districts. That’s alarming, considering what we know about the importance of highquality teachers in closing the achievement gap that persists between low-income and higher-income students. To recruit and retain highly effective teachers in the schools that need them most, Michigan must close the gap in teacher pay.

CURRENT GAP:

$15,177

AVG. SALARY GAP FOR

HIGHEST- AND LOWEST-

POVERTY DISTRICTS

2030 PROJECTED GAP:

NOT YET AVAILABLE

CURRENT RANK:

46%

OF TEACHERS ABSENT

MORE THAN 10 DAYS

2030 PROJECTED RANK:

NOT YET AVAILABLE

TEACHER ATTENDANCE

WHAT IT IS:

This measure represents the percentage of teachers absent from their jobs more than 10 days at the state level.

WHY IT MATTERS:

According to a recent report from the Center for American Progress, about 46 percent of teachers in Michigan were absent from their jobs more than 10 days, on average. That’s about six percent of the school year, which is equivalent to a typical 9 to 5 year-round employee missing more than three weeks of work on top of vacation time.

STUDENT ATTENDANCE

WHAT IT IS:

This measure represents the percentage of eighth-graders absent three or more times in the last month based on the national assessment.

 

WHY IT MATTERS:

not only are Michigan’s teachers missing too much school, but our students – especially our African American students – are missing far too many days of school, often against their will due to disproportionate rates for out-of-school suspensions. According to the 2015 national assessment, 22 percent of Michigan’s eighth-grade students said they had been absent from school three or more days in the last month. Moreover, detroit leads the nation for absences among urban districts, with 37 percent of students absent three or more days in the last month.

CURRENT RANK:

22%

OF 8TH GRADERS WHO REPORT

FREQUENT ABSENCE

2030 PROJECTED RANK:

20%

OF 8TH GRADERS REPORT

FREQUENT ABSENCE

 

CURRENT RANK:

45TH

2030 PROJECTED RANK:

43RD

OUT-OF-SCHOOL SUSPENSIONS

WHAT IT IS:

Data from the Civil Rights Data Collection measure discipline rates nationally.

WHY IT MATTERS:

One of the most troubling practices in Michigan – and around the country – is the overuse of suspension and expulsion, particularly for students of color. Overall Michigan ranks 45th. For African American students, Michigan has the fourth highest out-of-school suspension rate in the country. A full 20 percent of the African American students in Michigan schools were suspended in 2013-14.

COLLEGE AFFORDABILITY

WHAT IT IS:

This indicator is measured as the percentage of family income needed to pay for four-year college. data represent the net cost as a percent of median family income.

 

WHY IT MATTERS:

It’s not enough to get into college. young Michiganders have to be able to afford to stay in school and graduate. Unfortunately, Michigan ranks near the bottom in college affordability – 42 of 44 – for students overall. And for families in the bottom 20 percent of income in Michigan, the cost of college for one child, after receiving financial aid, is about 77 percent of their annual income.

CURRENT RANK:

42ND

2030 PROJECTED RANK:

NOT YET AVAILABLE